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Family Law Lawyer Colorado Springs Advice on Child Support

When married parents’ divorce or separate, or when only one of the unmarried parents of a child has custody, the court may order the “non-custodial” parent (the parent with whom the child does not live) to pay a certain portion of his or her income as child support says Family Law Lawyer Colorado Springs. This is not the only scenario in which child support might arise. Less frequently, when neither parent has custody, the court may order them to pay child support to a third party who cares for their child. No matter what situation gives rise to the need for child support, it might help to think of the legal right to child support as being possessed by a child (which it technically is), for his or her proper care and upbringing, regardless of who actually receives child support payments.

What is it?

A subset of family law and as in Child Custody law, overlaps with divorce law. Child support is court-ordered payment by one parent to the custodial parent of a minor child after divorce or separation as a contribution to the costs of raising the child. This is a provision to ensure that the child should receive equal support from both parents which it would have received if there was no divorce. Usually, the amount of child support is based on the income of both parents, the number of children, the expenses of the custodial parent, and any special needs of the child says Family Law Lawyer Colorado Springs. Most states have child support guidelines that establish the ordinary support required to raise and care for the child. It may also include health plan coverage, school tuition or other expenses, and may be reduced during periods of extended visitation such as summer vacations.

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Family Law Lawyer Colorado Springs Advice on Child Support

Terms

Child support generally continues until the child reaches 18 years, graduates from high school, is emancipated or, in some cases, for an extended period such as college attendance. The amount and continuation of support may be changed by the court upon application of either party depending on a proven change of circumstance of the parents or child expresses Family Law Lawyer Colorado Springs. Child support is not deductible from gross income for tax purposes nor is it taxed as income. Child support orders are issued by the family court, which bases the amount of the support on the state child support guidelines. These guidelines establish the amount of support that must be paid, based largely on the non-custodial parent’s income and the number of children. The court will also take into account other relevant factors, such as the custodial parent’s income and the needs of the children. The court can deviate from the guidelines if there are significant reasons for doing so.

Visitations

Child support and visitation are independent obligations states Family Law Lawyer Colorado Springs. One cannot stop paying support if visitation is denied, nor can visitation be denied for nonpayment of child support. A person who denies ordered visitation or fails to pay ordered child support can be held in contempt of court and states have various remedies, which vary by state, for pursuing claims against parents who owe back child support. Such remedies may include driver’s license suspension, wage garnishment, and attaching unemployment compensation, worker’s compensation, and federal tax refunds, among others.

Family Law Lawyer Colorado Springs Advice on Child Support